Guide YANNIS (Cretan Saga Book 1)

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Contributions range from long papers for completed projects to short papers for work in progress with preliminary results. In the long tradition of the archaeology of the eastern Mediterranean bodies have held a prominent role in the form of fi gurines, frescoes, or skeletal remains, and have even been responsible for sparking captivating portrayals of the In the long tradition of the archaeology of the eastern Mediterranean bodies have held a prominent role in the form of fi gurines, frescoes, or skeletal remains, and have even been responsible for sparking captivating portrayals of the Mother- Goddess cult, the elegant women of Minoan Crete or the deeds of heroic men.

Growing literature on the archaeology and anthropology of the body has raised awareness about the dynamic and multifaceted role of the body in experiencing the world and in the construction, performance and negotiation of social identity. In these 28 thematically arranged papers, specialists in the archaeology of the eastern Mediterranean confront the perceived invisibility of past bodies and ask new research questions. Contributors discuss new and old evidence; they examine how bodies intersect with the material world, and explore the role of body-situated experiences in creating distinct social and other identities.

They highlight the new possibilities that emerge for the interpretation of the prehistoric eastern Mediterranean through a combined use of body-focused methodological and theoretical perspectives that are nevertheless grounded in the archaeological record. Edited Journals. The journal is dedicated to the publication of original research articles and reports focusing on, or related to the archaeology, art and material culture in the broader Greek world, from the earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era.

View on aura. This paper examines the available evidence for mortuary variability in the cemetery of Phourni in an effort to investigate the existence of social ranking in the corresponding Archanes community during the Prepalatial period. Since the s, archaeometric analysis has changed drastically the picture of the Prepalatial period, providing new evidence about its characteristics, its organisation, and its complexity. This paper applies a synthetic approach to This paper applies a synthetic approach to recent data combining the archaeological and archaeometric studies of pottery from sites across Crete.

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The clay recipes and technological characteristics of the various wares are presented, and the co-existence of Cretan and non-Cretan shapes is investigated. The pottery examined derives from burial and settlement sites ranging in date from the Final Neolithic to the end of the Early Bronze Age.

This integrated approach provides important evidence about the identification of local and imported pottery, the ceramic traditions, and the contacts of Crete with the rest of the Aegean and the mainland. The ceramic repertoire, the wares, and the technological choices raise anew the issues of the organisation of production, the distribution of the products, and the identity of the people who produced and consumed the pottery during this early period in Crete. Since the s the Museum of Archaeology and History of Art of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens has played a significant educational role, facilitating the theoretical and practical training of students of the Since the s the Museum of Archaeology and History of Art of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens has played a significant educational role, facilitating the theoretical and practical training of students of the Department of History and Archaeology in the documentation and interpretation of its collections.

In , the transportation and study of the prehistoric pottery from the Minoan cemetery at Livari East Crete in the premices of the museum, resulted, for the first time, in the transformation of the museum from a rather passive or indiferent exhibition hall into a lively laboratory of archaeological practice on excavated archaeological material. Papadatos , Mortuary practices, the ideology of death and social organization of the Siteia area: the Petras cemetery within its broader funerary landscape more.

Mortuary practices of the Pre- and Proto-palatial period in the broader Siteia area show a remarkable degree of diversity, even between sites that are only a few kilometers apart. Within this context, the emergence of Petras as an This paper focuses on the mortuary practices of the region, aiming at placing the cemetery of Petras within wider historical and geographical contexts, and defining its influence on other communities in the area. The paper deals with human presence in Marathon during the Middle and Late Bronze Age, on the basis of the preliminary results from the excavation of the Department of History and Archaeology, of the National and Kapodistrian University The paper deals with human presence in Marathon during the Middle and Late Bronze Age, on the basis of the preliminary results from the excavation of the Department of History and Archaeology, of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, at Plasi, Marathon.

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The idiosyncrasies of the Knossian material can be viewed as a hybrid lithic tradition that emerged from interaction between migrant Anatolian farmers and indigenous hunter-gatherers. Aim of this paper is to show that comparative analysis of the Cycladic-type figurines from different areas, when taken beyond typological similarities and focusing on the evidence for body modification and painting, allows the Aim of this paper is to show that comparative analysis of the Cycladic-type figurines from different areas, when taken beyond typological similarities and focusing on the evidence for body modification and painting, allows the identification of regional differences that may have existed.

The Rise and Fall of the First Greek Culture on Crete

For the Cyclades it is argued that the figurines and the human body constituted a blank canvas onto which people could write, erase and rewrite symbols and messages, through which they could express and negotiate their identity and also represent values, ideas and beliefs of the society in which they lived and died. The evidence for the preparation and application of pigments in the cemeteries shows that such practices were an integral part of the funerary ritual, at least in the cases of high-status and wealthy burials, but the use of paint on figurines and the human body in other occasions during the life cycle of the figurines and the persons that used them is also possible.

The situation in Crete seems to be rather different, despite the strong typological similarities between the figurines of the two regions. The figurines of Crete, although typologically similar to or influenced by their Cycladic counterparts, show that such notions were not present in this region.

This is rather Indeed, the results of her work have often been used as an argument against the existence of full-time sculptors and high-level specialisation. Despite its preliminary character, our work reinforce previously expressed ideas against the presence of specialized full-time sculptors and organized workshops. Future experimental work will deal with issues that have not been examined by previous research, such as the apprenticeship of inexperienced individuals and the ability of one craftsperson to manufacture different varieties or even different types of marble figurines.

In Archaeological Work in Crete 3 more. The paper is a preliminary report on the archaeological evidence produced by the intensive survey in the areas of Sopata and Mesorrachi, close to the village of Skopi, near Siteia, East Crete. This is a remote, poor and heavily eroded This is a remote, poor and heavily eroded area, with thin soil deposits and limited agricultural capabilities. The survey revealed eight sites of Final Neolithic FN and Early Minoan EM dating, and nine modern farmsteads, while other periods are underrepresented or entirely absent.

In FN the entire population inhabited a relatively large village at Sopata. In EM I the population moved from Sopata to Mesorrachi, but habitation was fragmented into six isolated farmsteads and small hamlets. Despite this fragmented picture, however, the entire community of Mesorrachi used a single collective tholos tomb of the Mesara type to bury the dead, probably as an effort to enhance social cohesion between its members. Only two sites continued into EM II, and then the area was virtually abandoned and never inhabited or exploited intensively again, until the modern times.

The observed settlement pattern and the history of habitation at Mesorrachi have many resemblances with other remote and poor Cretan areas, such as Ayiofarango, Zakros and Ziros, suggesting common habitation strategies as an effort to ensure the survival of these small fragile communities in marginal environments.

The Emergence of trade and the integration of Crete into the wider Aegean in the late 4th Millennium: new evidence and implications with Y. Horejs and M. Mehofer eds. Proto-urbanisation in the 4th millennium BC. OREA 1, Papadatos Tholos tomb cemeteries of the Prepalatial period in North and East Crete: old problems and new evidence more.

Papadatos, Y. Marinatos eds. Athens: Kardamitsa Editions. Between the years and at the age of Sp. Marinatos excavated three Prepalatial tholos tombs, two at Vorou, and one at Krasi. Marinatos stressed the fact that these cemeteries lie outside the core area of the tholos tombs, i. Recent studies of the cemeteries at Phourni, Livari and Mesorrachi provided new evidence on these old problems and opened the way for further discussions and revisions. Ever since the definition of a Bronze Age in the Aegean, more than a century ago, explanations for its origins have been sought in an intensification of external contacts, traditionally placed in EB I.

However, the precise nature and However, the precise nature and timing of these contacts and the social contexts in which they developed have long remained unclear due to insufficient data. This monopoly over the resource of distance was in turn exploited locally and regionally in east Crete, as a social strategy, to construct advantageous relationships with other communities. As such Kephala Petras appears to represent the earliest of a series of such gateway communities, which are known to have operated along the north coast of Crete in later periods.

The implications of this are also discussed in the light of additional evidence from neighbouring regions, as part of an effort to understand the dynamics of the long-distance trading networks that emerge in this period in the Aegean.


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Papadatos and Sofianou The systematic character of a rescue excavation: archaeological research of two Minoan cemeteries in the area of Siteia more. On the basis of the existing archaeological legislation and the long-established tradition, excavations in Greece are divided into two basic categories: rescue and systematic excavations. This has lead to a strict legal and institutional This has lead to a strict legal and institutional framework regarding the conditions under which excavations are conducted in Greece, their aims, their character, the rules to be followed and the institutions involved.

This presentation refers to the rescue excavation of two Minoan cemeteries at Livari Skiadi and Mesorrachi Skopi, in the Siteia prefecture and the subsequent study of the material. The excavation was conducted by Chrysa Sofianou, archaeologist of the 24th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities, with the participation of Yiannis Papadatos, Lecturer in the University of Athens, Department of History and Archaeology and a small group of students of archaeology. On the basis of this collaboration, we discuss the framework that regulates the rescue excavations in Greece.

Our experience showed that such collaborations, when possible, and especially in periods of financial crisis, contribute significantly to the effective fulfillment of the scopes of both institutions: that of the Archaeological Service, which is to protect the antiquities and study the archaeological material, and that of the university, which is to carry out research and educate new archaeologists in excavation practices. Sofianou This report is concerned with the excavation of an Early Minoan circular 'tholos' tomb of the This report is concerned with the excavation of an Early Minoan circular 'tholos' tomb of the Mesara type and the survey of the surrounding area at the site of Mesorrachi, near the modern village of Skopi, in the region of Siteia, East Crete.

The excavation and the survey were undertaken during two different seasons, the fall of and the summer of by the 24th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities in collaboration with the University of Athens, Department of History and Archaeology. The excavations revealed a circular tomb. Through surface survey it was possible to identify the location of the corresponding settlement, but test trenches did not reveal any other structures in the area.

According to the finds, the use of the tholos and the habitation site are contemporary. Tomkins Currently, long-distance trading, This longboat-trading model envisages an essentially static configuration of trading communities situated at nodal points in maritime networks of interaction, an arrangement that was brought to an end, by the beginning of EB III, with the introduction of the masted sailing ship. The results of recent excavations at the FN IV—Early Minoan EM IA coastal site of Kephala Petras in east Crete paint a picture of an early trading community that, thanks to its close Cycladic connections, enjoyed preferential access to valued raw materials, to the technologies for their transformation, and to finished objects.

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Papadatos Celebrating with the dead: strategies of memory in the communities of Prepalatial Crete more. Celebrating with the dead: strategies of memory in the communities of Prepalatial Crete, in C. Karamanolakis and S. Aim of this paper is to discuss the rich funerary evidence from Prepalatial Crete c.

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It is argued that a large part of the relevant archaeological evidence belongs to memory rituals referring to the collective corpus of the ancestors, rather than to funerary rituals of particular dead individuals. Several alternative suggestions are discused in order to explain the reasons why ancestors were particularly important for the life and well-being of the Prepalatial Cretan communities.

Finally, it is argued that the Prepalatial cemeteries, consisting of monumental collective tombs, built above ground and used for several centuries by large groups of people were not simple depositories for the dead people of the contemporary communities. Instead, the constituted eternal landmarks, predestined to last for centuries as residences of the ancestors and as places in which the surrounding living communities constructed, maintained, controlled and transmitted one of the most important categories of collective social memory, that of the ancestors.


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  7. Papadatos Back to beginnings: the earliest habitation at Petras more. Tsipopoulou ed. Athens: Danish Institute at Athens.